Lámh Sign For Please

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Please

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Please

Hi there,

Welcome to the sign of the week.

One of the signs that parents and teachers often ask me for is the sign for PLEASE.
So, I thought you would like to try it too!

While it is important for all children to learn manners and words associated with politeness, children with language delays might need more time to understand and learn how and when to use these words.

So, when is the best time to introduce social words to children with language delay?

It is best to wait until a child can communicate their needs and wants, make choices, and use basic language to interact with others (using words, signs or pictures).

Words such as please and thank you are associated with politeness, but those words don´t carry helpful and essential information to the child. It is crucial to focus on pragmatic language first before considering introducing words like please and thank you.

However, once the child can communicate basic needs and wants, they might be ready to learn social words such as PLEASE.

So, we´ll practice lots of politeness in the classroom, as the sign of the week is PLEASE.

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Lámh Sign For Please

Lámh Sign For Please

Sign of The Week – PLEASE
One of the signs that parents and teachers often ask me for is the sign for PLEASE. So, I thought you may like to try it too! It is important to focus on pragmatic language first before we consider introducing words like please and thank you…

read more

Subscribe to my newsletter and learn a new sign every week, read one of my articles or watch my video blogs where I answer questions I receive from primary school teachers, special needs assistants, and early years educators of children with autism.

Lámh Sign For Easter Egg

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Easter Egg

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Easter Egg

Hi there,

Welcome to the sign of the week.

As you will see on the video, I have a little helper with me this week teaching the sign of the week. My son Sebastian is showing you one of the essential Easter signs: EASTER EGG.

You can learn more Easter signs on my YouTube channel.
Click HERE to view these signs.

EASTER EGG HUNT
Last year, my children and I had a lot of fun recording an Easter Egg Hunt with Lámh signs. I did this to give families and teachers ideas on how to use Lámh during the egg hunt.

What surprised me was the number of people who told me the kids themselves loved watching it and signing along. I was delighted to hear this.

I hope you and your children enjoy our Lámhly Easter Egg Hunt.

So, the sign of the week, starting on Monday the 29th of March, is EASTER EGG

You may also like…

Lámh Sign For Please

Lámh Sign For Please

Sign of The Week – PLEASE
One of the signs that parents and teachers often ask me for is the sign for PLEASE. So, I thought you may like to try it too! It is important to focus on pragmatic language first before we consider introducing words like please and thank you…

read more

Subscribe to my newsletter and learn a new sign every week, read one of my articles or watch my video blogs where I answer questions I receive from primary school teachers, special needs assistants, and early years educators of children with autism.

Restricted Interests In Children With Autism

Restricted Interests In Children With Autism

Having restricted interest is a common characteristic of autism. Children with autism tend to focus in depth on an issue or activity and have difficulties shifting their attention from the area of interest to something else.

This is often a problem in primary education, as in primary education, we aim to introduce children to a wide variety of subjects. Many students with autism would prefer to study in depth specific topics rather than focus on a wide variety of subjects they have little interest in.

However, we know that many autistic adults have transformed those so-called “restricted interests” into their professional careers. So, should we continue to force autistic students to study the broad curriculum and ignore their passions?

Knowing our student’s interest can be a powerful tool for us teachers. Including their interests in the general curriculum can help them gain interests in certain subjects. For example, if a student is very interested in trains, how could we incorporate it into maths or English classes? Can we use train activities to help them interact with their peers?

My son Sebastian loves music and, before covid, he joined the school choir. It was so wonderful to see my son (who had just started joining his mainstream class on a more regular basis) being able to join the choir without any additional support. Using his interest (music) for inclusion worked so well for him. He met other children, same age kids, because of their shared interest in music.

I have also observed many times when working with my students that when we incorporate children’s interest (the so-called “restricted interests”) in their learning, we often see them becoming more motivated and needing less support doing school work.

When looking at children with autism, rather than seeing their “restricted interests” as a deficit and something that needs to be corrected, I invite you to look at this from a different angle.

Discover your student’s interest. They may be interested in flicking pages of a book, Pokemon, the Titanic, or computers. Now find a way to incorporating these into their school routine.

Use that interest as a starting point for learning about other things. Maybe they can write about it, draw a picture, learn history, geography, or perhaps you can use them to help them feel more comfortable and at ease in the classroom.

What are your student’s interests? Have you tried to incorporate their favourite topics in the classroom? Let me know in the comments below. I’d love to know.

Silvia.

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Lámh Sign For Flower

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Flower

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Flower

Hi there,

Welcome to the sign of the week.

I hope you had a nice St. Patrick’s Day yesterday.
I am blessed to live in county Wicklow near the sea, and considering what we would typically be doing on this day, a walk on the beach was perfect to celebrate our national day.
The sunshine made yesterday so unique, as it usually rains on St. Patrick’s day.

Next week, I picked a sign that we’ll be using more and more as the good weather continues, the sign for FLOWER.

So, the sign of the week, starting on Monday the 22nd of March, is FLOWER

You may also like…

Lámh Sign For Please

Lámh Sign For Please

Sign of The Week – PLEASE
One of the signs that parents and teachers often ask me for is the sign for PLEASE. So, I thought you may like to try it too! It is important to focus on pragmatic language first before we consider introducing words like please and thank you…

read more

Subscribe to my newsletter and learn a new sign every week, read one of my articles or watch my video blogs where I answer questions I receive from primary school teachers, special needs assistants, and early years educators of children with autism.

Lámh Sign For Ireland

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Ireland

Sign Of The Week: Lámh Sign For Ireland

Hi there,

Welcome to the sign of the week.

Saint Patrick’s Day is almost upon us. This year (2021), as last year, all festivities are cancelled, which means no parades and dancing on the streets of the major cities and towns in Ireland and across the world!

However this year, many tows are being creative, just like mine, and most people are decorating their front gardens so we can all cheer each other up, celebrate this day at home, and keep it special for our little ones.

So I want to teach you a sign that you will need when talking about St. Patrick’s Day in the classroom: the sign for IRELAND.

You may also like…

Lámh Sign For Please

Lámh Sign For Please

Sign of The Week – PLEASE
One of the signs that parents and teachers often ask me for is the sign for PLEASE. So, I thought you may like to try it too! It is important to focus on pragmatic language first before we consider introducing words like please and thank you…

read more

Subscribe to my newsletter and learn a new sign every week, read one of my articles or watch my video blogs where I answer questions I receive from primary school teachers, special needs assistants, and early years educators of children with autism.